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Underbody braces, turbos and more!

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 11, 2013 9:43 pm 
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I think this explains things quite nicely...

http://www.tuneruniversity.com/blog/201 ... advantage/

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 11, 2013 10:20 pm 
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Too bad the article didn't explain the benefits of using the hotter thermostat in relation to fuel.
However, if it gets one person to drop their old school back yard ways and stick with the stock temperature thermostat, all the better!

People who read this forum can actually teach their older generation relatives a thing or two about modern day OBD II and I vehicles. Most of the old geezers got out of the repair game when cars switched from carburetors and don't understand the wisdom of the newer systems.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 10:57 am 
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Teaching the old guys would be nice..... If they would listen.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 6:41 pm 
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the article that was linked explains very logically why it's usually best to run the thermostat range that was specified by the engine manufacturer.

even on my hopped up turbocharged g10 engines i use the specified 180 degree f t-stat. i have had to make improvements in other components to efficiently shed heat while the engine is heavily under load and working very hard.

the 180 degree spec on the turbo3 is due to the fact that the engine coolant is also used to cool the turbo cartridge which adds a considerable load on the cooling system. a turbo3 under load and high revs will easily hit the 210 degree range even with an aluminum radiator of twice the stock capacity and a much more efficient radiator fan.

even though the subject is coolant temp related and t-stat range specific, i want to also mention the oil cooling system i use to regulate engine, and specifically fire deck temperatures. t-stat opening temps set the basis for the coolant heat range but once it has opened it doesn't do much for regulating the upper end of the range - wide open is wide open. after that, it's all about cooling system capacity and heat exchanger efficiency. on a high output engine, anything that you can do to shed excess heat is magic and cooling the oil helps a ton.

i routinely use 25% underdrive pulleys on the crank which slows the water pump impeller speed, increasing contact time and latency in the coolant flow allowing better heat transfer within the radiator

one last thing that i have found to be very useful is using a pid type pulse width modulated fan speed controller in concert with a high efficiency fan on the heat exchanger. a click on/ off type thermal switch to control the radiator fan is very basic. my fan speed controller pulses the fan with a 100% voltage to get the blades spinning and then reverts to 50% fan speed at the low temp set point. as the coolant temp increases the fan speeds up as it tries to control coolant temps. it's okay for it to run at 100% when the engine is under higher loading but it saves a lot of electrical energy by running less than 100% when the engine is more lightly loaded and still improves overall efficiency at shedding heat.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 10:04 pm 
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Most of my cars have a hole in the top of the Thermostat.I have had them Fail closed and fail open.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2013 5:57 am 
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Interesting article, and they're not wrong, but the point of increased wear as a result of a difference of 20F degrees in coolant temp is as negligible as they suggest the performance gains to be.

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PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2013 4:22 am 
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t3 ragtop wrote:
the article that was linked explains very logically why it's usually best to run the thermostat range that was specified by the engine manufacturer.


Can't argue with that. I've also noticed that every Suzuki ECU that I've examined retards the timing when the temperature goes outside the design range in order to back off the power and try to limit the temperature rise.


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 11:59 pm 
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suprf1y wrote:
Interesting article, and they're not wrong, but the point of increased wear as a result of a difference of 20F degrees in coolant temp is as negligible as they suggest the performance gains to be.


Amen brother. I was wondering if I was the only one here who figured that.

IMO, for a thermostat that opens at 10F lower than the oem one, I see no issue...especially for driving in a tropical climate.

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