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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 1:03 am 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
I just bought a new hood for my Swift. It came with black primer. I need to paint underneath the hood. I am thinking of using cold galvanized primer and then spraying with spray can truck bed liner? I believe this is my best shot at keeping it from rusting. I want to try to spray between the outer sheet and the frame as much as possible. As long as I don't get too messy, I think it will turn out OK. The only problem is there is no undoing once I spray the truck bed liner under the hood. I think I may spray my GEO hood first and see how I like it? If any one else has any other ideas, please let me know!

Thanks, Shimaze

The can spray truck bed liner (in case you don't know) is real similar to standard issue rubber undercoating, except that it is way tougher and actually has a decent flat black appearance. Remember this if you are going to undercoat any thing on your car: use spray can truck bed liner!

_________________
1993 Suzuki Swift GT DOHC / 5-speed
1996 GEO Metro 1.0 3 cyl. / 5-speed
Other cars & motorcycle:
  • 2001 S10 Xtreme
  • 1996 Impala SS
  • 1994 Camaro Z/28
  • 1988 Honda NX650
  • 1980 Honda PA50
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 9:38 am 
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Location: UK
Keep in mind that temperatures are much higher under the hood than under the car, might have some problems with that.

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I ride a Honda, but I drive a Suzuki.

99 Honda CB600F Hornet
90 Suzuki Swift 1.6 GLX 4WD


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PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2012 1:04 am 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Ah, truck bed under coating is not recommended! It has way too low of a heat threshold. It can only withstand 120 degrees Fahrenheit. I am thinking of using caliper paint. It can withstand very high temperatures. In addition to the high heat, it can also withstand the harsh conditions that a caliper goes thru. Caliper paint is very tough and can withstand a lot of abuse. I will use silver to reflect the heat away from the hood. This should help the paint on the outside of the hood.

PS> This is my reply from product support:

Thank you for contacting Dupli-Color. We appreciate your inquiry.

The Truck Bed Coating can only withstand up to 120 degrees F. For this reason I would not recommend using it under your hood. The Engine Enamel would be a much more suitable product as it can withstand up to 500 degrees F.

I hope you found this information helpful. Please email me back if you have any additional questions.

Regards,

Jill
Dupli-Color Product Support

_________________
1993 Suzuki Swift GT DOHC / 5-speed
1996 GEO Metro 1.0 3 cyl. / 5-speed
Other cars & motorcycle:
  • 2001 S10 Xtreme
  • 1996 Impala SS
  • 1994 Camaro Z/28
  • 1988 Honda NX650
  • 1980 Honda PA50
Shimaze's cars


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PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2012 6:32 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:16 am
Posts: 412
Location: sidney, nebraska
You could try powder coating. It gets applied electrostaticly so it gets drawn into some nooks and crannies, baked at 350 degrees and tougher than nails. It can be pricey though.

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"If you think education is expensive, try ignorance." - Derek Bok


1990 geo metro 1.0 5 speed 3-door hatchback "herbie"
1990 geo metro 1.0 5 speed convertible "sportie"


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PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2012 7:28 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:02 pm
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Location: North Florida
While I don't recommend & wouldn't want "spray can bed liner...underneath the hood" it's hard to imagine the product "can only withstand up to 120 degrees F"? It wouldn't even be suitable for pickup beds! In full sunlight a black surface can be expected to endure significantly higher temperatures, likely in excess of 160F. Of course when you park w/hot motor (180F-195F coolant, exhaust manifold much hotter) the heat soak on hood is much higher.

Millions of vehicles annually get regular paint inside the hood w/o any issues. Have never seen an instance where anybody needed to "help the paint on the outside of the hood"? It seems to have never been a problem, regardless of color.

Suggest forgetting about "using cold galvanized primer...spray can truck bed liner...caliper paint" or considering "powder coating" or even "Engine Enamel" & just paint underneath the hood w/regular exterior paint. The "best shot at keeping it from rusting" depends on the "black primer" that came on it. Unless you intent to strip to bare steel & begin from scratch you'll only be painting that primer.

_________________
2000 Chevy Metro 3 cylinder 5 speed 3 door hatch
1998 Chevy Metro 3 cylinder 5 speed 3 door hatch
1998 Chevy Lumina APV
1998 Ford F-150 4X4 XLT
1992 Ford E-150 Club Wagon Chateau
1991 SAAB 900S 5 speed
1987 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1985 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1974 SAAB Sonett III
1971 SAAB 96 modified to 1980 specs
1966 SAAB 96
1960 SAAB 93F
1958 SAAB 93B
1964 Willys JEEP CJ-5
1954 Willys JEEP M-170 military ambulance
1953 Grumman Kurbside step van


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PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2012 7:28 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:02 pm
Posts: 644
Location: North Florida
While I don't recommend & wouldn't want "spray can bed liner...underneath the hood" it's hard to imagine the product "can only withstand up to 120 degrees F"? It wouldn't even be suitable for pickup beds! In full sunlight a black surface can be expected to endure significantly higher temperatures, likely in excess of 160F. Of course when you park w/hot motor (180F-195F coolant, exhaust manifold much hotter) the heat soak on hood is much higher.

Millions of vehicles annually get regular paint inside the hood w/o any issues. Have never seen an instance where anybody needed to "help the paint on the outside of the hood"? It seems to have never been a problem, regardless of color.

Suggest forgetting about "using cold galvanized primer...spray can truck bed liner...caliper paint" or considering "powder coating" or even "Engine Enamel" & just paint underneath the hood w/regular exterior paint. The "best shot at keeping it from rusting" depends on the "black primer" that came on it. Unless you intent to strip to bare steel & begin from scratch you'll only be painting that primer.

_________________
2000 Chevy Metro 3 cylinder 5 speed 3 door hatch
1998 Chevy Metro 3 cylinder 5 speed 3 door hatch
1998 Chevy Lumina APV
1998 Ford F-150 4X4 XLT
1992 Ford E-150 Club Wagon Chateau
1991 SAAB 900S 5 speed
1987 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1985 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1974 SAAB Sonett III
1971 SAAB 96 modified to 1980 specs
1966 SAAB 96
1960 SAAB 93F
1958 SAAB 93B
1964 Willys JEEP CJ-5
1954 Willys JEEP M-170 military ambulance
1953 Grumman Kurbside step van


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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 12:41 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 6:51 pm
Posts: 211
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Powder coating would not work because the frame & the skin of the hood are glued together. If the hood was baked at 350, it would ruin the glue and cause the skin & the frame to separate. I do agree that truck bed coating must be able to withstand temps higher than 120. When it get 100 degrees out and the sun is shining on it for hours, it has to get much hotter than 120. Nonetheless, it is obvious truck be coating can not withstand high temps. As for helping the paint, I always thought the underhood insulation was there to keep the heat away from the hood? Since my replacement hood has no insulation, I was going to use silver paint to reflect the heat away from the hood - for what little it would help?

My truck has an aftermarket fiberglass hood. It has no insulation and is painted red on both sides. The clearcoat is peeling on the outside of the hood (and only on the hood). The paint underneath the hood is just fine. The peeling may be due to age – this hood has been on the truck for 10 years. If the underhood heat has caused premature failure of the paint on my truck, I would like to avoid this same problem on my GT. But as you say, hoods get painted everyday with no issues. I think I will just use the silver spray caliper paint and be done with it. I have used this paint for parts on the engine like the manifold and I have had good luck with it. Plus, it only costs a few dollars more than regular paint.

Thanks for all the replies, Shimaze

_________________
1993 Suzuki Swift GT DOHC / 5-speed
1996 GEO Metro 1.0 3 cyl. / 5-speed
Other cars & motorcycle:
  • 2001 S10 Xtreme
  • 1996 Impala SS
  • 1994 Camaro Z/28
  • 1988 Honda NX650
  • 1980 Honda PA50
Shimaze's cars


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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 2:49 am 
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Posts: 504
Location: UK
The peeling on the hood might just be because of the sun, UV does that over time.

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I ride a Honda, but I drive a Suzuki.

99 Honda CB600F Hornet
90 Suzuki Swift 1.6 GLX 4WD


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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 7:11 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:16 am
Posts: 412
Location: sidney, nebraska
does your truk still have the insulation blanket under the hood? the peeling clear coat is usually caused by poor prep, poor quality materials or incompatible materials. Gm had problems in the 80's when they switchec to a more enviromentally friendly paint. Lots of mid to late 80's cars had the peel thing going on.

_________________
"If you think education is expensive, try ignorance." - Derek Bok


1990 geo metro 1.0 5 speed 3-door hatchback "herbie"
1990 geo metro 1.0 5 speed convertible "sportie"


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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 7:43 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:02 pm
Posts: 644
Location: North Florida
Here in The Sunshine State the clear coat or paint on a hood is no more prone to peeling/oxidizing than on a roof. Hoods endure a double dose of heat, baked by sun & motor. Clear coat on roofs peel even though routinely insulated & virtually all air conditioned.

The vast majority of the long list of vehicles I've owned did not have any insulation under the hood. If not for the later classic SAAB 900's none would've had hood insulation.

_________________
2000 Chevy Metro 3 cylinder 5 speed 3 door hatch
1998 Chevy Metro 3 cylinder 5 speed 3 door hatch
1998 Chevy Lumina APV
1998 Ford F-150 4X4 XLT
1992 Ford E-150 Club Wagon Chateau
1991 SAAB 900S 5 speed
1987 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1985 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1974 SAAB Sonett III
1971 SAAB 96 modified to 1980 specs
1966 SAAB 96
1960 SAAB 93F
1958 SAAB 93B
1964 Willys JEEP CJ-5
1954 Willys JEEP M-170 military ambulance
1953 Grumman Kurbside step van


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:04 am 
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Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 6:15 pm
Posts: 7
Location: queensland australia
pressed metal parts and panels are etch primed, sealed before there glued together... automotive 2k, acrylyic and enamals will do the job fine as long as you apply it properly. who ever suggested powder coating your bonnet is leading you a stray.

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