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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2004 7:34 pm 
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The right tool makes the job easy.


1. Wire tool. You know those yellow handled jobs that you get from CTC for $9.99 with 100 connectors? Toss em'. Cars have wires, lots of em. If you plan on doing any serious car audio work (even as a weekend enthusiast), get you some good ones. I have a set for crimping and a seperate set for stripping...
Image

These are the strippers I use...best ones I had were from Rat Shack...nice and cheap...
Image

2. Drill. I like my cordless drill...hell, it borders on love. A good cordless drill will be one of the handiest tools in your box. I use a 12V cause they are a bit lighter than the 18V out there and they still have good torque. Get a keyless chuck and make sure you have extra batteries. Nothing worse than a cordless drill with a dead batt. Corded drills aren't as convenient but are good if you get into building lots of speaker enclosures which can wear out the batteries on a cordless pretty quick. Spend money on Makita if you like but I've had my trusty Mastercraft for a couple of years now and it still works great.

3. Screwdriver set. Good for removing everything from door panels to TPS sensors :D. Invest in a good set. Cheap ones break or strip. Make sure they are comfortable or you'll blister your hands after prolonged use.

4. Socket set. Again, avoid the cheap sets. You can go to CTC and get a set just as good as the snap on stuff. It also has the same lifetime waranty. You will want Metric and Standard. 1/4", 3/8",and 1/2" drive. Remember to put the sockets back after you use them :)

5. To go with your socket set you will want a nice wrench set too. They can reach places that your socket set can't. They new stubby wrenches are very handy too. Again, don't skimp here. Nothing like forcing on a bolt and having a tool let go and destroying your knuckles.

6. Digital Multimeter. Good for diagnosing a host of electrical problems or doing measurment for stereo type stuff. Again, you don't need a Fluke. If you are gonna go hardcore then get it...they are definetly the best out there...you will pay a premium though.

7. Pick set. Good for popping out panels and probing behind them to know where the clips are. Nice for popping out speaker grills.

8. Knife. handy to have. Not gonna go into detail here...I'm sure you an think of a dozen things on your own.

9. Soldering. I have a gun and an iron. I use the gun for soldering speakers and 1/0AWG cable. Does it all. I use my iron for delicate work like relocating displays and such.

10. Torx, Allen and Star set. These can be used to undo seat belt bolts to panels to distro blocks.

11. Dremel. Very good tool to have for detail work or porting your intake for an enlarged TB. Don't go cordless. Variable speed is best and getting a flex shaft is a good add on as it's very useful.

12. Mini flashlight. Can't work if you can't see. Some places under your dash are DARK...live with it...get a mini flashlight. Mag Light is what I use and will never look back.


Now if you want to do more specialised things with stereo stuff or other fabrication...


1. Jig saw. Get a good one with veriable speed. Pay decent money for one 'cause it sucks when they burn out oin the middle of a project.

2. Router. Best tool for finishing wood and cutting out perfect circles in MDF. Get something with decent HP so that it doesn't bog down on thicker material. Get one with a vacuum attachment. They can make lot's of dust.

3. Clamps. Best thing for holding glued projects together or metal before you weld. Also makes a nice chip clip.

4. Palm sander. Nice for finishing enclosures. Saves heaps of time over hand sanding. Go a step up and get an orbital...much better.

5. Butane iron. Soldering guns can put out DC current when the tips break. This can ruin sensitive electronics. Butane irons solve this prob;em.

6. Propane torch. I use my gun to solder 1/0AWG to terminals but as soon as I have a house I'll be using a propan torch. MUCH faster and better overall.

7. Vice. Holds things sturdy while you work on them. Have you ever held a piece of cable while you soldered and end on it and burnt yourself? Get a vice. Als good for crimping large diameter cable.

8. Grinder. Good for cleaning metal (with a wire brush) or shapind plastic. Nice for sharpening stuff too.

9. Air stapler. Great for working with fiberglass. Best for stapling fleece to frame work before you lay the resin.

10. Heat gun. Nice for speeding up the curing of fiberglass or softening vinyl for door pods.

11. Table saw. Best/easiest way to make straight cuts in wood. get one with a vacuum attachment. MDF dust tastes like shit and isn't good for your lungs either.

12. Proper work bench. My last one was made with a 1" MDF top. Didn't feel guilty about messing up the top 'cause it's easily replaced. Make sure it's sturdy and can hold lot's of weight.


There are many more that I'm sure I'm leaving out here...this is more of a basic guide and will get the ball rolling with other members input...

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 2:36 am 
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Good post! I love tools (and need more). :D

I recommend 6 point sockets, unless you are working with 12 point hardware. And a couple of 3/8" ratchets with a lifetime warranty, they don't last forever if you keep slipping cheater pipes over the handles. :)

A flare nut wrench for brake lines.

An accurate torque wrench.

A real tire pressure gauge (digital or dial, not the pen style).

A good hammer, something a little heavier than a carpenter's claw hammer, can be very useful at times.

Big slip joint pliers are good for hose clamps and general destruction.

I have a manual tire changer from Harbor Freight. It's not great, but it's better than paying to have tires mounted.

Mechanix gloves are one of my favorite tools. Keeping your hands clean and unbloody is nice. Actually, now I have a pair of Wells Lamont MechPro gloves from Walmart that work just as good for half the price.

A decent floor jack is a must if you work on cars a lot. And jackstands if you're going under it. Even Suzukis are heavy if they fall on you.

Ramps are nice too, if you can find some that will fit under a car made after 1965. :roll:

And a shop is probably nice, I work in dirt, grass or gravel. Makes that floor jack into a plow when I drag it around. :lol:

A big pile of cash is good too, you will always need more tools. :D

_________________
1994 Metro - MPH project (getting a DOHC G13B)
1994 Metro - MPG project (getting an XFi G10)
1992 Swift - Parts car (gone)
1991 Swift - Parts car (gone)
1990 Swift - Parts car
1997 Metro - Parts car (gone)
1993 Metro - Parts car
1989 Swift GTi - Parts car
1998 Metro - Parts car


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 7:53 am 
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I have a moderate amount tools (need to buy another toolbox soon), and I usually go buy more tools if I have a specialized task. Just today I went and bought myself a tap & die set, an electric 1/2" drive impact gun and got a 2 for 1 deal on impact sockets. Rusted & seized exhaust bolts won't make me look like a sucka no more! :twisted:
*Power tools: I've use cordless tools and I like them for their convenience, but most places in civilized world usually have an AC outlet fairly nearby, or otherwise within reach of an extension cord. If you have to buy cheap power tools, buy cheap ones with cords instead of cheap cordless ones. I also recommend Makita for quality cordless tools, they were the first to use Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries for tools and leading the industry in battery technology. When you're looking for a cordless tool, don't just look at the tool. Look at the charger too. Make sure it's actually a smart charger. It should be heavy, indicating a big internal transformer and some substancial circuitry. The battery should have more than two terminals (the other ones will be for the temperature sensor used by the charger). Some crappy chargers *cough*black&decker*cough* consist of nothing more than a wall-wart that goes to a cheap lightweight plastic shell of a charger (AKA battery burner)
* Staple gun: If you ever need to use a staple gun buy an electric one, you'll never go back to manual. If you do a LOT of stapling, do like m said: go buy a good pneumatic one.
* Flashlights: white LEDs are dropping in price, there's no good reason why you should have to suffer with the hassles of incandescent light in this day and age. I also recommend that everyone go to http://www.photonmicrolight.com and get yourself a microlight that you can hang off your keychain (I've bought 8!). These things have saved lives, but you may also find them handy for digging around the engine compartment at night, or even saving you from scratching your paint while trying to unlock the car.
* Swiss Army Knife: I bought my first one in 1991, and it faithfully served me well until it it was stolen from my car in 2003. Just this week I bought a replacement, it's been hell without one! :evil: The stainless steel has a hard time holding an edge, but I've found the Phillips screwdriver to be practially indestructable (daily use for 12 years = negligable wear). Think of it as the toolbox you always have with you. If you buy one, only get the Victorinox brand. Swiss Army knives are supposed to be made in Switzerland, so why not get the brand that was originally awarded the contract by the Swiss military to make the original Officer's Knife? Service parts are also easily available too.
* Surgical forceps: What is tool fills the gap between tweezers and needle-nose pliers? Surgical forceps! Great for working with electronics or soldering. Even works well as a psuedo-vicegrip on microscopic fasteners.
* Impact centerpunch: when you need to start a hole, and can't find a hammer
* Multimeter: if you possibly can, spend the extra money and get an auto-ranging one (yes I do own a Fluke :wink:)
* Worklight: I have two; a halogen clamp light for engine work, and a compact fluorescent one for interior work. Get the ones that have a spare outlet on them.

The funny thing is despite all the tools I have, I still don't actually own a proper hammer.

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( miracle pour hole)
maybe a picture Thanks


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 10:46 am 
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awesome thread :D
Lighting - i use a flourescent worklamp, nice & bright & doesn't get as hot as the incandescant ones. i also use a petzel duo headlamp (leftover from caving), but nothing beats it when i'm working. those same tight spaces where the troublelight is too much, i usually want both hands free.

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'92 Swift GT, '94 Swift GT, '88 Turbo Sprint, '98 Swift ... all sold years ago


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 Post subject: Quality tools...
PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2004 11:49 pm 
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A legend in his own mind
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Location: In T-Dot-getting >35mpg in a non GTi
Torque wrenches..

My true love...

1/4" drive for inch/lbs
3/8" drive and 1/2" drive for foot/lbs up to 250

I love them...and they are A MUST when it comes to the cars these days that make everything out of light alloys

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2004 3:28 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2004 11:30 pm
Posts: 1706
Location: Rivendell
Having recently reached my 30 tenth birthday, my wife gave me the credit card and said, "go buy some tools"...

So, the workshop now has:

Complete set of open ended, ring, offset spanners plus (ugh) shifting spanners and pliers/screwdrivers. These are in a canvas holder and hang on the wall. Easy to pick what is missing...
A Creeper (you know the roller you lie on. brilliant for getting underneath and back.
Safety, Engine stands/ramps, a must..
Air compressor
Air tools- impact driver, air hammer, Socket driver, high speed rotary grinder. (may pick up a stapler and nail gun this week.... (60 US for both on special)
Torque wrench (vernier)
And a very small rachet driver to get in beside the cam cover.
and a couple of trolley jacks..

Missing 1 engine lifter and 1 engine stand. Thanks to moeymojomomomojojojo, will be fabricating one of each in the next week or two. (must rememeber to deliver some karma points)


I was going to pick up a parts bath, but the one on sale was only good for water soluble degreasers, ie a dish washer...

Also looking to fabricate some timing gear holders for use when replacing cam belts etc. Anyone interested?? will look to make so that they will lock together, hands free.

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Understeer is when you hit the wall with the front of the car and oversteer is when you hit the wall with the rear of the car.HP is how fast you hit the wall, torque is how much you push the wall out.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2004 1:23 am 
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ellpee2 wrote:
...Also looking to fabricate some timing gear holders for use when replacing cam belts etc. Anyone interested?? will look to make so that they will lock together, hands free.

I saw a device exactly as you described at a tool store today. It was a blue anodized gizmo, with two horizontal bars, each with pins sticking out to engage the cam gears. The two bars are connected in the middle with a turnbuckle type fastener. Rotating the turnbuckle causes the bars to draw together, with the pins binding the cam gears in place. I thought it was a really clever tool, but I wasn't interested in forking out $50 for it though :(

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jaguar,vettes&sprints wrote:
...can you inlighten me about lihtan's
( miracle pour hole)
maybe a picture Thanks


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2004 6:00 am 
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number one!

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ellpee2 wrote:
Missing 1 engine lifter and 1 engine stand. Thanks to moeymojomomomojojojo, will be fabricating one of each in the next week or two.


lol... I'll have to post up some more DIY stuff I have here cluttering up my laptop.

I use my 4" Makita mini grinder almost every time I go out to the garage. Most invaluable tool I've owned so far.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2005 10:12 am 
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Location: Kildare, IRELAND.
Just something handy for the glovebox is a Leatherman multi-tool or similar device.
It has pliers,file,knives,ruler,prying tools and other handy tools for simple jobs without having to drag the big toolbox out.

http://www.leatherman.com/

I also have a Swiss-Army knife aswell dead handy.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 3:31 pm 
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Location: Herts.
Some tools I find useful.

M6 stainless bolts. Ok not a tool but when I take out the Suzuki fastners I replace them with these so I know that I'm not going to have a problem with siezed bolts.

Copperslip. Just to be extra sure that those bolts are not going to sieze

Molegrips. I cannot believe nobody has mentioned these yet, the most invaluable tool I have. When the outside of the bolt has crumbled off leaving no working edges then these can usually grip the head and undo the bolt.

Centre drills: When a fastner does snap then these are great to start drilling them out. I have a BS1 and BS2 centre drill.

Twist drills: Also for drilling out bolts. I use Cobalt ones if I had the money then I would buy Carbide.

Screw extractors (Ez-out): Rarely have luck with these on larger fastners but they work great on the flange head bodywork screws. Dont force them, if they snap then you have a nightmare of a job getting the bolt out!

ellpee2 wrote:

...Also looking to fabricate some timing gear holders for use when replacing cam belts etc. Anyone interested?? will look to make so that they will lock together, hands free.


Lump of blu tack?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 8:27 am 
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dont forget about a welder and a miterbox


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 12:45 am 
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I dont know about Makita stuff.They dont have the best stuff out there(Cordless impacts,mainly IMO)There are other brands out there that can beat Makita,,,Milwaukee(heck they have a 28 volt Lithium-ion Battery,,the first in the industry!),Dewalt(Black & Decker's "Pro-line") Bosch,Porter Cable,Hitachi,but Makita has a cordless vacuum!!!!.Led lights are wicked,i second that! I have a 30 LED cordless drop light,,awesome!.BUT alot of screws on the engine are # 3 Phillips and the safest way is by a Hand impact( a tool that you wrap with a hammer)The tool that holds cams (well my tool,,) is made by Lisle $35.00 on sale from one of the tool guys. I love tools and have ALOT of tools(all brand name,,no crap) I get lost(and go further in debt) when i go into a tool truck or Sears.Locking extension Not the Craftsman one(junk) get one from Snap-on,Mac,Matco,Cornwell,etc.These are a MUST if you change spark plugs(so you dont lose the socket) Tap & Die set a must,,Multimeter,also a must.Use quality screwdrivers,not cheap ones,thats why some screws get ruined.For air tools,Ingersol-Rand is the best.

_________________
"One Of Three ORIGINAL (CERTIFIED) LNLC Co-Founders"
1991 Suzuki Swift GT.
1994 Suzuki Swift GT.
If my Swift was as fast as Tg or m's car I'd be famous...
My car is a trailer queen 'cause it's too slow to merge safely into traffic


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 12:46 am 
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And also a tool called "The Skewdriver" it gets into small/cramped quarters and you could use it by hand or drill.Cordless impacts are awesome,,if you have the money.And # 1 tool to have,,,FIRE EXTINGUISHER!

_________________
"One Of Three ORIGINAL (CERTIFIED) LNLC Co-Founders"
1991 Suzuki Swift GT.
1994 Suzuki Swift GT.
If my Swift was as fast as Tg or m's car I'd be famous...
My car is a trailer queen 'cause it's too slow to merge safely into traffic


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 8:43 am 
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I second the hand impact! So many times I find some screw/bolt that I do not want to strip the crap out of, and its the hand impact to the rescue.

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GeoZukiGTi wrote:
This makes me wanna hurt someone, really bad. Where's Hitempguy, he's expendable
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You have a girlfriend? :shock:

HiTemp Inc. ....... taking over the world one Sprint Turbo and Swift GTi at a time.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:19 am 
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One note to add about Air Compressor1 GO BIG!@#$# :twisted: Yes as big as you can afford. Not only will it last longer as it has to work less but will handle most anything you can throw at it. I got a Vertical one as space is at a premiem in my garage. I went with a 4.5 hp / 21 gal. Air tools make working on a car fun! Make sure you have 2 hoses in case one decided to give up the ghost on you. Also go with 120v as most 240v modles are stationary. :lol:

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Metroless and looking for another already!!
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 Post subject: the right tool
PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 4:57 pm 
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Location: NorCal, USA
here's a tool for working on fuel systems or other rubber hoses--

Image

same tool close up

Image

the tool really helps with stubborn fuel hoses. :shock:

good luck :)


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 3:51 am 
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Location: Omaha Ne. U.S.A.
One thing I HIGHLY recommend,is a set of GOOD Sockets/Ratchets/Wrenches. Average ones is just that,,,average,it CAN get the job done,but a good set ,it WILL get the job done.Craftsman IMHO makes REALLY good sockets.They are cheap,easy to warranty,and have a good selection. IF you desire something more,Then you will pay more $$$ but are worth it.One of the tool guys I was talking to,was asked about "average"tools,and he said"People dont understand. Professional tools are made for just that,,the Professional,,people who make their money with those tools."Average"tools are just that,,average.they are good for a backyard mechanic,but If used everyday,can fail." I have seen many people who rely on cheap-average tools and end up stripping nuts/bolts because for instance,open ended wrenches jaws can spread,rounding off the fastener,and hurting you. Just my 2 cents.

_________________
"One Of Three ORIGINAL (CERTIFIED) LNLC Co-Founders"
1991 Suzuki Swift GT.
1994 Suzuki Swift GT.
If my Swift was as fast as Tg or m's car I'd be famous...
My car is a trailer queen 'cause it's too slow to merge safely into traffic


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:11 am 
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Location: Omaha Ne. U.S.A.
Here is another couple of tools to buy. GEAR WRENCHES and SNAP RING PLIERS!! If you decide to work on your tranny,you'll need,MM sockets(Biggest one I believe is 26mm,preferbally a 6 Point) snap ring pliers, a Hand Impact with a # 3 Phillips Bit,Torque Wrench,a Soft face hammer,Grey sealant,and Blue threadlock.Just remember people,The tool will stay with you as long as you take care of it and dont lose it. And remember QUALITY is the Key. You get what you pay for.

_________________
"One Of Three ORIGINAL (CERTIFIED) LNLC Co-Founders"
1991 Suzuki Swift GT.
1994 Suzuki Swift GT.
If my Swift was as fast as Tg or m's car I'd be famous...
My car is a trailer queen 'cause it's too slow to merge safely into traffic


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 5:08 pm 
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Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
For Weather Pack (and other) connections, try the Lisle 14900 Terminal Tool...

http://www.teamswift.net/viewtopic.php?t=31555


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 5:32 pm 
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Location: Emerald city Washington
---"Needtherighttool"

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.

t3 ragtop wrote:
the 3 banger isn't at all a "grenade." it's a tough little son of a bitch doing a big job. respect it.
suprf1y wrote:
I didn't save anything.Vehicles are to me, like little boys are to Tommy.Toys to be abused for my own personal pleasure.
jrjd wrote:
"Driving a Swift GTi is like driving a bike in your house".


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 8:31 pm 
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Ha Ha thats what the Shop floor at my new Job Looks Like!! And the sad thing is,,It is the other Techs :(

_________________
"One Of Three ORIGINAL (CERTIFIED) LNLC Co-Founders"
1991 Suzuki Swift GT.
1994 Suzuki Swift GT.
If my Swift was as fast as Tg or m's car I'd be famous...
My car is a trailer queen 'cause it's too slow to merge safely into traffic


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 8:48 am 
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I remember using a toilet plunger as a hood prop when I was working on my bro's old Supra. :lol:

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jaguar,vettes&sprints wrote:
...can you inlighten me about lihtan's
( miracle pour hole)
maybe a picture Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 10:05 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 9:19 am
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Location: Chester County PA
A MAPP gas torch....


I don't know how I survived all these years without one.
It will make freeing up rusted bolts CHILD'S PLAY. :-)


Also if you're doing the timing belt, a Chain wrench from vise grip is THE DOGZ BALLZ!!!!





Jimmy


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2007 11:41 am 
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Location: ipoh perak
please also spare the special alternator wrench spanner. it is a bit tricky and hard to take out those nurds. i have to modified my 12mm spanner to just loosen the nut for adjusting the belts.


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