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DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair
http://www.teamswift.net/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
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Author:  Phil N Ed [ Fri Nov 28, 2008 6:01 pm ]
Post subject:  DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

Many of us have come across studs broken off...excuse the terminal preposition. Here's an example:

Let's say you were changing the O2 sensor...an MK1 is shown below:
Image

Next you find that one of those little bolts has been broken "off" inside the exhaust manifold:
Image

So what should you do?
Most guys just put it back with two bolts, or leave it off.
Some people have claimed that the "easy out" is the way to go. But I've tried many times and had no luck with an 'Easy Out'...
Some need expensive tools, or will send it to a machine shop.
Others weld something on, and wrench on that.
But what if it's flush, or recessed a bit?

Finally, an example showed up, so I thought I'd run through a quick, easy, and safe way to do it yourself.

First, drill a pilot hole into the center of the broken stud:
Image

Now that you've got a good start, continue all the way through the old bolt. Here, I've placed the correct bolt next to the pilot hole, so you can see how deep to drill.
Image

Some people get scared that they can't hit the center of the bolt. Others are worried that they'll mess up the threads. Just using a hand held drill, and with the exhaust manifold on an upside down trash can, it wasn't too hard for me to get it pretty close to center. No big deal if you take your time. No big deal if you aren't perfectly centered.

Now...we're into it about 7 minutes. Here's a blurry picture of what the hole looks like as I change to a larger bit. Notice that the bolt is getting pushed into the threads of the exhaust manifold. There is no danger to the threads.
Image

Again, a few minutes later, the second drill bit has passed through the bolt. Although a little blurry, you can still see lots of metal between the drill and the threads.
Image

Now, we pass still another drill bit through the hole, this time rendering the old, sheared off bolt paper thin. This allows us to put a tap through the threads, and that breaks up the last of the bolt. It's slow going at first, but once you get the tap started, it's a piece of cake to turn it in a few turns, and then clean out the pieces, and so on, until you end up with this:
Image

Just in case you are confused about what kind of tap I used, here's a picture of it being used to clean up the threads on the lower part of the exhaust manifold:
Image

The time to do this entire 'job' was less than 30 minutes.
I've read well meaning posts which have side-stepped or 'poo-pooed' this method as being too tough for the average individual. The tools I used here were ordinary tools that are commonly available.
You'll never know how easy it is until you actually try it.

Author:  1995Firefly4dr [ Fri Nov 28, 2008 6:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

I did just this last week. Except I attached the tap into my cordless drill. Makes it faster.

Author:  swifterthanu [ Fri Nov 28, 2008 7:21 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

Bought heat treated bits for this very reason. I use this safe method often, as I feel this is the safest and cheapest way. 8)

Author:  bobross [ Mon Dec 01, 2008 9:41 am ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

Very nice writeup PnE. Too bad we don't have karma anymore :(

Any chance a mod can move this over to the FAQs section so it doesn't get lost in the insanity of Problems and Fixes?

Author:  Phil N Ed [ Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:54 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

bobross wrote:
Very nice writeup PnE. Too bad we don't have karma anymore :(

Any chance a mod can move this over to the FAQs section so it doesn't get lost in the insanity of Problems and Fixes?


Ha!
Cheer up, it's almost Christmas.
Nice thing about Karma is that it changes.
At least we haven't been banned.......yet! :lol: :lol: :lol:
We should ask Santa for some Karma...and some new '3 tech' head bolts.
I found the thread of the guy who had a problem earlier this year. He could have used this technique...and Suprf1y's bolts.
Once you take the time to do this, it reminds you to put your stuff together right the first time!

Enjoy:
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=38025
And be thankful you didn't have his Karma.

For those who didn't get it the first time, here's a hint:
"See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil, have no fun..."
Image

Next time, use this technique and pull out those broken studs!

Author:  t3 ragtop [ Mon Dec 01, 2008 5:24 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

i'm tellin'!!!!!!

you called her "have no fun!" :lol:

Author:  Phil N Ed [ Mon Dec 01, 2008 6:56 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

You're a smart man!

She's a physician too, but not my wife, just one of her classmates in Med School.
Picture was taken in the Chinatown section of San Francisco.
Ha!
Fooled you.
And as far as having no fun...
She ain't got no boyfriend, far as I can tell. :shock: :o :shock: :o :shock: :o ...has never had one.
Talk about strict upbringing.

Makes me wonder how she's escaped all the horn dogs the past 30 years or so.

Now if she'd broken off 5 studs into the block...whoa! Now there's a babe!
...that's what I call a WAX JOB! :wink: :wink: :wink:

Author:  Lihtan [ Mon Dec 01, 2008 7:00 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

I've used a Dremel with a small carbide burr to do the same thing. You can shave the inside of the bolt down thin enough so that only the outer threads remain. You can then pick at it, and extract a corkscrew of metal that used to be the old bolt.

Author:  raygo [ Thu Dec 04, 2008 5:28 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

Great Job Phil, this topic should be stickied in the How To Section :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Author:  jaguar,vettes&sprints [ Wed Dec 24, 2008 7:12 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

It's Christmas even and JV&S is out in the cold shop pulling a "phil"...
worked great thanks phil
.
Image
.
Image
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GV&S

Author:  Phil N Ed [ Thu May 01, 2014 8:23 am ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

A few additional thoughts:
-if you are extracting broken bolts from a cylinder head or block start with a small drill bit and then switch to a REVERSE drill bit and often the offending part will back out of the block/head.
-if the stud is in a difficult place, try using an air drive angled reverse drill; this week I used the above combination successfully to remove a broken bolt from inside the head on an A/C car:
Image
(adjacent to cylinder #1, MK1 shown)
-be patient; if your drill bit isn't sharp, it may take a long time to begin making a hole; either sharpen the bit or start with a new one if possible.
-once you've extracted the threaded part, clean it as usual with a tap and removed metal shavings using air
-often, heat is not necessary and there was NO reasonable way you could safely weld a bolt to the stud in the above engine unless you removed the engine from the vehicle.

Don't over think broken stud removal. Try this simple method before resorting to heat and/or welding.

Author:  harry56 [ Sat May 27, 2017 11:00 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

I = Intake E = Exhaust :wink:


สมัครบาคาร่า

Author:  87paperchuckerTurbo [ Sun Jun 04, 2017 3:08 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: DIY Broken Stud Removal and Repair

Adding my .02 left handed or "reverse"drill bits are another method hit the broken stud or bolt with some penatrating lube then get in there with your drill let it get hot and as soon as that bit bites it usually yanks the broken bits out real quick. I find when I use an easy out at my shop the last guy didn't know what he was doing and the size I need is destroyed :shock: . I don't bother using a pilot hole just a spring loaded punch and a drill bit about half the size of the broken bolt.

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