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 Post subject: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 1:27 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Recently, as in just today, I've picked up a 1998 Geo Metro G10 for $300.

A little on the specs, the goods, and the bads.

Specs:
The engine is, of course, the 1.0L 3 Cylinder.
150,000 miles
5 Speed Manual, of course

The Goods:
Newer Battery
Newer Alternator
New Air Filter
Oil Change (probably conventional)
Newer Plugs and Wires

The Bads:
Dents on the body, all around (baseball bat dents it seems like)
Right Tie Rod is loose
Rear Right Wheel Bearing is very very bad (National/FedMogul replacement soon)
Exhaust Leak after Catalytic
Interior is trashed
Rear Main Seal is Gone
Oil Pan Gasket is not well put together
Downshifts goofy into 2nd and 1st when rev-matching

What I'm looking at, near obvious, is gas mileage. The body is toast, the interior is nothing to speak of (though the radio works!), and the engine needs a bit of help. This is one of the first vehicles I've had that is OBD2 compliant. I know what goes into modding some cars that are OBD2, but most of my vehicles have been, and will be, 1994 and newer.
So! I've got a few things I'm interested in doing to increase MPG, anywhere from a brand new tune up, full synthetic oil and good filter (after rear main seal replacement of course), full synthetic gear oil, and good wheel bearings all around along with good brakes, lightening the body even more, minus the Driver's air bag.

Just so you all know, this will be a project car until it's finished to my standards and the parts aren't too much of a consequence (I work at a parts store so that's always a plus).

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2013 11:35 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:10 pm
Posts: 880
Location: Vancouver, WA
first and most importantly check for rust in the front frame horns where the lower control arms bolt. if those are bad stop now.



after that....general tune, get it mechanically sound, 3tech economy cam. oil pan gasket is ultra grey silicone only. no gasket.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 11:27 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
VR4 wrote:
first and most importantly check for rust in the front frame horns where the lower control arms bolt. if those are bad stop now.



after that....general tune, get it mechanically sound, 3tech economy cam. oil pan gasket is ultra grey silicone only. no gasket.


Why not go with the gasket or gasket and silicone?

Checked the frame points at the control arms, a little rust on the top of one, but still structurally sound, will be using some rust remover and rustoleum paint on it to keep it from getting worse over time.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 4:47 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Replaced the timing belt with the Gates Powergrip and the timing cover gasket. Took the opportunity to clean off the timing cover, bolts, and pulleys as well.
Looks a heck of a lot better, but still not all that great, but it'll get there.

Before I turned the key over I wanted to double check the TPS and ISC. The ISC came back with good results, though it does make a little noise when the engine isn't running with KOEO, as if it's moving the plunger in and out. As far as the TPS is concerned, I check the volts going to it and it's max is a little lower than what book states; 3.85 or so volts. Should be, at the very least, about a volt higher than that for WOT to be within specifications. So, I may have to pick up another TPS from a yard and check that one as well. Rather not purchase a new TPS that lists for around $130.

I'll also have to do the TPS adjustment procedure to see if that will change anything to do with a rather odd idle.

The symptom the vehicle is having is, when cold, it will start up and idle fine, although a little lower than what it should. Basing that just on sound alone. However, once the engine warms, she tends to die out. I did, as a theory, keep the car off but with the key on the 'On' position and let the blower do it's work getting rid of some of the heat.
Tried one more time to start the engine and she turned over perfectly, idled fine (though still a little low). My assumption is, that even without the OBD2 CEL going off, is that the Coolant Temperature Sensor is causing the vehicle to run rich, much like open (closed?) loop, flooding the engine. Check the new plugs I just put in not too long ago (NGK BPR6EGP, platinum G power plugs, nothing's too good for the Metro apparently) and they were a bit fouled/wet with gasoline. Found that the gap on the plugs is just fine as well; .039".
In any case, it is odd that there is no CEL, but allowing the engine to cool and blasting the heat fixed the problem, which leads me to the Coolant Temperature Sensor. And it will be replaced within a week. Heck, might even do a full flush, hoses, water pump, clean the coolant crossover pipe, and thermostat while I'm at it.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:37 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 7:47 am
Posts: 149
Location: WA
These cars don't use oil pan gaskets. Just rtv. If you use a gasket it will leak sooner or later. Don't do it. It deforms the pan mounting surface if you use the cork gaskets auto parts stores sell. I unknowingly used one my first time and it leaked and then I found out the aftermarket gaskets were parts made for no reason. Same as on subarus. No gasket, just rtv. Save yourself the headache.


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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 11:56 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
After some advice on GeoMetroForum, along with doing a double check, I removed the new plugs I had just put in the Metro; NGK BPR6EGP platinum plugs. They did pretty decent. I've had them in for about two hundred, maybe three hundred miles. And here they are:

Image

Cylinder 1

Image

Cylinder 2

Image

Cylinder 3

Image

Cylinder 2 spark plug is not near as clean as the picture appears, it's the darkest of them all. Cylinder 1 plug is in decent condition, and cylinder 3 plug is the best of the three. Something tells me I might have either a head gasket leak, burnt valve, bad valve seat, bad valve guide seal.

I replaced them with the OEM NGK BPR6ES plugs, along with the air filter. I noted on GMF.com that it was having a hard timing running when hot, but ran perfectly when cold. Figured it was due to the fuel injector as I've replaced the plugs, wires, distributor cap and rotor, oil change, new(ish) battery. However, after installing the injector I've ran into the same problems, though it does idle a little better. I removed the battery cable to reset the ECU and let the car idle for 30 minutes (in which the fan apparently didn't turn on and led to the engine warming damn near the red line. Possible ECT sensor, but without a code?).

Engine seems to run better when the heat is on full blast. Getting rid of the heat seems to cool down everything enough where the engine can finally put most of the fuel to use rather than bogging down at idle and intermittently stalling when the accelerator pedal is pushed to the floor to get up to speed.
Cooling fan does turn on when the ECT sensor connector is disconnected; putting the fan into a 'safe' loop.

I may try a fuel pressure regulator tomorrow night to see if that's going to be the problem as well, which it definitely could be. Have yet to check fuel pressure, though I used the noid light to make sure the wiring was working properly, which it is.

Feedback tomorrow on whether or not the spark plugs will help the engine in comparison to the platinum plugs.

Edit 1:

Also, I adjusted the throttle linkage stop so it is now actually touching the throttle linkage and slightly pushing it, not so much that it's causing a high idle, but idling at a decent RPM. Of course, this will have to be double checked further on.

I will also be checking the ignition timing (but with a '98 I'm sure all timing is set by the ECU and is not adjustable for spark, though maybe the distributor will have a little bit to say about that).
TPS and ICM will be tested again.
Fuel pressure will be tested.

In the future I may remove the gas tank and remove the OE fuel filter from the fuel pump and relocate it to the outside of the tank for easier access and the ability to actually change it without removing the entire tank. Would a swap to a MK2/3 fuel pump fit well enough in the MK4/5 fuel tank and provide enough fuel without running lean?

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 6:34 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Have since figured out my fuel economy issue; bad Coolant Temperature Sensor. Fuel economy has doubled, no more stalling when the engine has reached normal operating temperature.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2013 9:55 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:02 pm
Posts: 644
Location: North Florida
This....

98chevymetro wrote:
These cars don't use oil pan gaskets. Just rtv. If you use a gasket it will leak sooner or later. Don't do it. It deforms the pan mounting surface if you use the cork gaskets auto parts stores sell. I unknowingly used one my first time and it leaked and then I found out the aftermarket gaskets were parts made for no reason. Same as on subarus. No gasket, just rtv. Save yourself the headache.


But also, note, after GM adopted the Crank Position Sensor, that adding a gasket (particularly a thick granulated cork/rubber gasket) can shim the sensor away from the ring (it's supposed to read) enough to screw up ignition.

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1998 Chevy Metro 3 cylinder 5 speed 3 door hatch
1998 Chevy Lumina APV
1998 Ford F-150 4X4 XLT
1992 Ford E-150 Club Wagon Chateau
1991 SAAB 900S 5 speed
1987 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1985 SAAB 900 Turbo SPG
1974 SAAB Sonett III
1971 SAAB 96 modified to 1980 specs
1966 SAAB 96
1960 SAAB 93F
1958 SAAB 93B
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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 6:35 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
A few days ago the crappy weld job that the PO did on the downstream oxygen sensor gave way and the O2 sensor fell off, creating this loud obnoxious hole just behind the cat, coupled with the other holes in the exhaust system I couldn't take it anymore and had Bill's Muffler and Brake bend some pipe and put it all back together for relatively cheap.

So, here are the pictures; straight back after the catalytic. Gotta good little rap to it at a certain RPM (which I don't know yet given no tachometer).

Image

Image

Traded a T25 turbo to a guy to do all the welding on the floor pan and the control arm rust. That should definitely help it through the winter here in Minnesota.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 8:37 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Recently installed the Equus 6068 tachometer on the Metro. I'll do a write up after I get a few more pictures. Only have one or two right now.

Edit: A quick wiring picture for the Equus 6068.

Image

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:43 pm 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Noticed that the G10's performance going uphill (as it is mostly uphill my way home from work) was substantially lacking the past week. Had to be in fourth just to stay at 55, and it would be barely capable of going any faster than that.

Image
Cylinder 1 is pretty decent, a bit worn, but not bad.

Image
Cylinder 2 is a bit better, but definitely not factory.

Image
Which leaves me with cylinder 3, the usual suspect to a burned exhaust valve. Yep, think I found the problem.

Did a wet test on that one as well, compression went down. Rings are good on that side, but that valve isn't holding hardly anything. Definitely a contributing factor to the lack of power and the more dirty oil. Are there any hypothesis on why it's normally cylinder 3 that burns the exhaust valve?

My guess is the oil pump isn't creating enough pressure.

I'll be getting 3-Tech's swirl polished exhaust valves and might do a cam at the same time. Be bringing the head to Midwest Engine here in Duluth to get checked for cracks/decked if necessary, might even do a 3 angle. Got a total price for parts (gasket set, valve seals, valves, head bolts, and rod bearings), mostly through my work; 170.80 (not including tax, machining, piston rings (if I feel the need to depending on how cylinder walls look), oil, coolant and miscellaneous).

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2013 11:13 pm 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Within the week I'll be replacing the rod bearings on the vehicle along with cleaning some oil pan bolt holes and making sure that the oil pan itself is flat. This will be the third time that the oil pan has leaked significantly. Most likely it's the oil pan that is bent. It does have a bend on it, but not enough, I had believed, to tweak the oil pan enough to leak, especially with adding quite a bit of black RTV. But, we'll see.

Connecting rod bearings ordered are standard size across the board. Will be using Sealed Power along with Platigage, of course, to find out if I need bigger rod bearings.

Hopefully within the next six months I'll be able to purchase everything necessary or an engine along with all the components to rebuild the G10. Around my area they run 200-400 out of the vehicle. That's a bit much to pay for something that's been sitting and may or may not work flawlessly.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2013 8:29 pm 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Since the engine has been knocking for a little while and the previous oil change yielded some negative results in the pan, I've decided that it's high time to change out the rod bearings on the Metro. Eventually, the rods, crank, and everything else will be disassembled, cleaned, machined, and reassembled. But for now, rod bearings will have to do.

Image

Standard sized connecting rod bearings, nothing fancy. Couldn't find, as of yet, oversized rod bearings through my work that are readily available without a shipping charge/Sealed Power actually having to make them. I'll have to Plastigage before complete installation of the rod bearings. Check for scoring of the crankshaft. Twenty three bucks for the rod bearings isn't that big of a deal if they eventually need to get replaced again before acquiring an entirely new engine to spend some money on.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 7:38 pm 
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Location: Duluth, Minnesota
About to do the rod bearings on the Metro. Going to take pictures, do a write-up, and how much it will cost overall. Keep in mind, I do get my parts a bit cheaper since I work for a parts store.

Connecting Rod Bearing Replacement

Cost
Connecting Rod Bearings: 23.92 (3-1140RA)
Oil and Filter: 29.12 (Valvoline Nexgen Max Life 5W-30 Bosch 3402 filter (WIX 51085 as the thread matches the WIX 51348 filter, just more capacity))
Black RTV
Plastigage: 1.69 (SPG1) (This is the closest Plastigage I could find for the necessary clearance limit of .0008"-.0019").

Difficulty
3/5

Time Required
Approximately 2 Hours

Tools
Jack
Jack Stands
Oil Filter Wrench
18MM Wrench
10MM Socket
12MM Socket
17MM Socket
Socket Wrench
Torque Wrench capable of 26 foot pounds


Step 1:

Pop hood, remove oil cap, chock rear wheels, raise vehicle, set on jack stands, then drain your oil.

Step 2:
Remove transmission's flywheel inspection plate, remove Crankshaft Position Sensor, remove all bolts from oil pan and gently pry off with cloth-covered screwdriver so as not to damage aluminum block.

Step 3:
Check all bolt holes and stud for marring and bad threads. Tap as necessary (which I will have to do). Remove RTV/gasket material from bottom of block and oil pan.

Step 4:
Turn engine with 17MM socket and wrench so #1 is BDC and easily accessible. Remove 12MM nuts and rod bearing cap.

Step 5:
Put vacuum caps/tubing over studs on rods to protect crankshaft. Push up slightly on connecting rod to reach the rod-side bearing. Remove bearing from cap, cover new bearings in assembly lube, and reinstall. Make sure you orient the bearings and cap properly for reinstallation or you might suffer from a spun bearing/connecting rod/crankshaft scoring.
Tighten nuts to 26 ft/lbs evenly (tighten each nut equally until 26 ft/lbs is achieved).

Step 6:
Repeat for connecting rods 2 and 3.

Step 7:
Check oil pan for straightness by either using a straight edge or laying the pan upside down on a level surface. Providing the oil pan is level and straight, use black RTV on the oil pan and set into place with the two nuts on the studs. Install the rest of the bolts into their place. Providing the oil pan has a slight bend, tighten the less flush part of the oil pan first, then the more flush next to keep it as straight as possible.

Step 8:
Connect crankshaft position sensor socket, put on oil filter (51085 fits well, but requires an additional .8 quart of oil), fill with oil (approximately 4.5 quarts with 51085 filter), prime oil. Start engine, make sure there are no external leaks and oil light disappears. Recheck oil level. Listen for any knocking.

The Gain
No more rod knock for one. I expect to see a little higher gas mileage and power without that rod knocking about, giving a much steadier power band.

Suggestions
Get a lift. It makes this job so much easier. Also, if you're from the north, get a space heater to keep you warm while crawling under a Metro getting dripped with oil.
If a person were so inclined, they could always use an engine flush; Marvel Mystery Oil would be my choice as it's not nearly as abrasive as SeaFoam or MotorFlush is since they are more cleansing agents, not so much oil and cleansers. Cleaning it up will help a lot with sludge build up, if there is any. If you decline on using an engine cleaner, just run the engine for a few minutes before draining the oil to make everything come out much easier.

The oil pan could tell a little bit of a story here.

Image
I had to thicken up the oil quite a bit the last two oil changes; 10W-30 along with some really thick Rislone, which I don't like using. Engine oil is all it should need. The deposits from the rod bearing and the oil additive are left behind as you can see. The brass is from the additive, the chunks of aluminum, well, those are from the rod bearing breaking apart.

The condition of connecting rod bearing 2, rod-side.
Image

As you can see, it's badly worn. Cap-side wasn't as bad, but it did have a lot of metal particles in the seep hole, not allowing enough oil to get in between the bearing's surfaces.

Image

Cylinders 1 and 3 were not bad at all. Plenty of life left. I can't imagine rod bearings 2 was due to oil starvation, but lack of oil changes. Probably picked up something bad throughout its life.

Cylinder 2 bearing up close
Image

Image

Crankshaft, connecting rod and cap journals looked decent. I can't say they were good, but looked okay. This is a quick fix, certainly not the best it could have been, but the engine will last a little while longer now.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Sun Jan 12, 2014 9:09 pm 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
More updates on the poor little Metro.

For the (hopefully) last time I've dropped the oil pan and replaced it with a brand new one (PN GMP47A)! Hurray! Purchase price was around $60 with shipping.

Also got a hold of cleaning out two of the threads on the transmission side of the block; the hard to get to ones. So far I haven't had any leaking oil going onto the catalytic and smoking out everyone behind me. There is a bit of smoke, but I'm hoping it's residual as I've started the car after an hour of it sitting in the garage. No smoke coming from the catalytic.
Image

While I had the car in the garage I took care of the broken exhaust pipe mount by changing the metal hanger's mounting point. It'll hold for a little while, but a muffler shop will be needed to weld a new one on.

During replacement of the oil pan, I dropped the downpipe, replaced the manifold to downpipe exhaust packing and used bolts instead of the chintzy threaded rod, nuts, and awful washers (know any place to get the factory hardware?)

Also, added new front speakers. Pioneer TS-G1644R that sound much better than the old Infinitys (that will be relocated to the rear and set up only as bass and mid-range) that I had in there to replace the even worse OEM speakers. Thanks to the wife as a Christmas present!

Did this as well to mine since it turned out so well when I did it to the wife's MX-3.
Image

Image

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:52 am 
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Location: Duluth, Minnesota
After doing the 'fix' of jumping the wires on the back of the dimmer switch for the instrument panel, the fix started to smoke. Must have hit itself another ground somewhere along the lines. Didn't blow the fuse, which was odd. I'll have to take a better look at it. Scrambled to take the knee panel apart and pull out the jump wire. Nothing seems to melted just be feeling, but that of course means nothing until I can get the entire thing apart.

Also, I purchased myself these

Image

Mostly so I wouldn't get run off the road. They're a bit brittle, at least the horns are, as I've heard. But overall, they should work just fine. Don't know where I'm going to mount them exactly, but it will be nice to let people know where I'm at on the highway, especially the Hummers, Excursions, Trailblazers, Buicks, Oldsmobiles, and Cadillacs. You know, the big cars that old people and stupid people drive.

Also, I've gone ahead and looked at what standard round air filter I can replace the disc style filter that is normally in the Metro along with a mounting rod. I've got part numbers as well, but would like to see what I can come up with completely before posting results.

And of course, the horsepower, torque and mileage are decreasing immensely due to burned valves (I'd still like to buy all six 3Tech!) unfortunately, I can only afford small 'toys' right now. SO needed new glasses and that set us back quite a bit given she's without vision insurance. Anyway, I'll still buy them...but eventually.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 4:10 pm 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Recently bought and installed some WOLO 400 horns to replace the OEM weak horn. Turned out pretty well. Here's the video.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 6:25 pm 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Welp, since I've got myself a new job and have been earning enough to warrant changing to a different car, I think I'd rather put some money into the Metro, even though the body and undercarriage is not that great. It's going to need internals definitely; valves of course, rings, cleaned lifters. Since I intend to have this car for a little while now, I'll have to get the rust under control, which should be do-able this summer since the fiance's weekend car can get driven on a daily basis for a little while. That'll give some downtime to do the engine work. But would it be worth it?

Here's my fuel logs from EcoModder (apologies for the bad format):

Image

As you can see the mileage is awful. Would it be beneficial to do the rebuild given how money I've literally burnt out the tailpipe because of the bad valve? Also, neglect any catalytic converter purchase since I'm in a state which does not require emissions because racecar.

The only things that have to be factored in are the labor for the machining of the head (might as well get the some stuff cleaned/ported) and the head possibly decked. I've 'lost' $160.00 so far since tracking on EcoModder, but I've owned the car longer than that and have put a little bit into it already.

Overall, I believe it's worth the money to rebuild the engine, but give me the lowdown.

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Last edited by CaffeineTripp on Wed May 28, 2014 5:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 5:48 pm 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Ended up getting a little bored and seeing if I could find a top/carb hat that would fit onto the Metro's TB. I would like to have a nice one made by Todd (badgs750@AOL.com), but given how the Metro looks and what's going on with it, I think not. So, I opted for choice #2 of getting something that would do the same job, albeit cheaper and require some modification; a carb hat, or in this case a throttle body hat, from a ~1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee with a 5.9 Liter (the 5.2 is the same as well, you can opt for the 3.9 Dakota top hat as it does stand a little taller, but hood clearance may be affected, let alone the length of the threaded mounting rod).

Here's the top hat before modification. Unfortunately, I don't have any on-car pictures, but no worries, I'll get them before I get into this.

Image

Image

Image

The tall lip there might have to get reduced down, since the hat is plastic I will only have to use a Dremel with a sanding/cutting disc. The metal support might have to come off as well.

Image

The inlet is rather large, but there are all those molding ridges everywhere. Could hurt to smooth everything out. I will be using metal for the intake, but the plastic Spectre stuff would work well and not heat soak as much. Standard cone filter will work too.

After doing a test fit, without taking pictures, the oil dipstick does get in the way, but it's just a matter of bending it a tad and it'll fit just fine.


This is going to be the test mule of a car I suppose. Is there anything that the community would like me to try out within a reasonable budget?

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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 8:46 pm 
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Location: Pembrokeshire
Let us know how it goes because I am looking for the same sort of thing. Does the hole on top line up ok?


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 Post subject: Re: 1998 Gas Miser G10
PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 6:50 am 
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Posts: 34
Location: Duluth, Minnesota
Mintimus wrote:
Let us know how it goes because I am looking for the same sort of thing. Does the hole on top line up ok?


Unfortunately no, it doesn't, but I'm not giving up on it. The hat itself has a slightly larger diameter and will need an adapter plate. I believe I might be able to get away with a thick plastic/metal disc to fill the gap between the two. Then either JB Weld (or rather a much cleaner and more professional way) the adapter to the hat. Should turn out just fine after that. I will have to remove the engine lift point as well, but nothing more than the two bolts and it's out. Other than that, it'll cost around $15 total I would imagine and a little effort at getting everything together.

The other thing I noticed was that the hat itself is much shorter than the stock cleaner assembly, so there will need to be a spacer for the threads to hold everything down. An inch or inch and a half sleeve should work just fine along with a larger enough washer on the bottom to cover the newly rounded mounting hole.

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