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Underbody braces, turbos and more!

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 11:35 pm 
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Location: Boise
Swapping a Sidekick 1.6 engine in place of the Metro 1.3 engine Informational Blurb.

If your Metro engine is a Multiport Fuel Injection type, then swapping in the Sidekick 1.6 throttle body engine is just not feasible. The only similarities are they are both made by Suzuki. Otherwise, if your Metro 1.3 engine is a carbureted, or throttle body engine, then read on.

An adapter to mate the 1.6 Engine to the 1.3 Transmission, such as the one sold by http://www.TrailTough.com is required.

You must use the Sidekick 1.6 engine starter, with the Metro 1.3 engine flywheel. Attempting to use the Metro starter has been tried, and may work for awhile, but usually causes damage to the flywheel ring gear. Smart folks have better things to do with their time and money then pulling the engine again and replacing the flywheel. Be smart; use the Sidekick 1.6 starter motor the first time.

The Sidekick 1.6 passenger side short block mounting holes are not in exactly the same place as the Metro's 1.3 short block engine mounting holes. As a result, the Metro passenger side wheel shaft support bearing cannot be properly attached using all three bolts. Only two of the three bolts will fit which is not acceptable. One person actually modified the 1.6 aluminum block by welding on another hole mount. This is not going to be easily done by most folks. Construct an "L" shaped adapter bracket to support the passenger side wheel driveshaft support bearing and attach by using all 3 bolts into the 1.6 block.

The stock Sidekick 1.6 oil pan (and pickup tube) needs to be swapped with the Metro 1.3 oil pan. This is because the exhaust manifold on a Metro transverse engine routes under the back half of the engine, whereas the Sidekick oil pans are constructed to provide clearance for the 4x4 front axle pumpkin at the front of the engine.

Expect to also modify the oil pickup tube by using parts from both the 1.6 and 1.3 pickups to make one good workable one. The tubing size for both is different. You will have to weld one within the other, and without leaving a pinhole leak. Remember, the oil pickup tube is a suction tube. One small leak and you're sucking air, not oil.

The Sidekick 1.6 engine is about one inch taller, so expect some interference issues when closing the hood.

A Sidekick 1.6 engine produces more heat then the Metro 1.3; therefore the stock radiator may need an additional fan, depending on what city/location you reside in.

The Metro 1.3 engine from 1996 (and newer) will have a crankshaft sensor attached to the front of the engine. The Sidekick 1.6 engine does not have this sensor. This sensor must be added in order to use the 1.6 engine with the 1.3 metro computer and throttle body system.
While it sounds easy to "just add the sensor", it's more involved then that.

Here's how: In order to add the sensor, Suzuki modified the oil pump, the oil pan, and the short block. A special slotted wheel was added behind the timing belt pulley. So you would have to use the Metro slotted wheel and sensor, plus drill and tap a hole in the short block and oil pump for the sensor to screw into. The hole location must be precise as the computer is using these timing pulses to control spark. If your hole is off, so is your timing.

Radiator hoses will require rerouting. Depending on your metro's year, it could get quite involved, but not impossible. The Sidekick 1.6 engine receives radiator water from the front of the engine at the water pump, and exits the water from the front of the engine through the intake manifold. Metro's typically exit the water from the back of the head.

The 1.6 cam is designed for more low-end torque because the Sidekick is a four wheel drive. Your Metro 1.3 engine will actually have only 10 less HP, and less torque then the 1.6 engine.

Torque is great if you're driving a tractor on the farm, or your Metro is now a rock crawler, otherwise all that extra torque means less available horsepower to go much faster, much sooner. Sure the 1.6 has 10 more HP, but the piston stroke is longer and therefore top RPM is lower.
Most likely a stock 3 cylinder Metro will blow away your 1.6 enhanced Metro right off the line.

Conclusion:

All in all, if your desire in swapping the Sidekick 1.6 engine in place of the Metro 1.3 engine is because you feel the 10 extra HP will make you go faster, then you're sadly mistaken. The extra amount of work and money involved in just getting the 1.6 engine into the Metro, and then operational is not the best path to go.

And after it's in and working, you still need to address the issue of re-jetting the throttle body to take advantage of the larger displacement engine. Without the re-jetting, you have a sadly underpowered Metro.

There may be other issues with the computer not understanding why some flow parameters are different.

I started this research not because I wanted the extra HP to go faster, but simply to replace a bad 1.3 engine with the more commonly available (and cheaper) 1.6 engine in my Daily Driver.

I now see it's actually cheaper and involve less work to rebuild the engine. It would be good for at least another 100k miles, will pass Smog inspection, still has great resale value, and will perform better.

Hope this helps you in your engine decision process.

Donald Roberts


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 12:18 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2003 4:16 am
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Quote:
The 1.6 cam is designed for more low-end torque because the Sidekick is a four wheel drive. Your Metro 1.3 engine will actually have only 10 less HP, and less torque then the 1.6 engine.

Torque is great if you're driving a tractor on the farm, or your Metro is now a rock crawler, otherwise all that extra torque means less available horsepower to go much faster, much sooner. Sure the 1.6 has 10 more HP, but the piston stroke is longer and therefore top RPM is lower.
Most likely a stock 3 cylinder Metro will blow away your 1.6 enhanced Metro right off the line.


Not true.
The 1.6 cam has 10 degrees more duration, and .5mm (.020") more lift, and is a nice upgrade from the 1.3 cam.
A 1.6 Metro would absolutely destroy a 3cyl car.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 5:43 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:10 pm
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Location: Vancouver, WA
or you can get a 1.6 engine/trans from an esteem. everything SHOULD bolt up.


only problem i can forsee looking at them side by side is exhaust due to the 1" taller deck height.

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98 swift 1.6 16v swap
03 cobra bolt ons
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 20, 2009 11:14 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 4:14 pm
Posts: 69
Location: North Mexico, Arizona

I did the 1.6 conversion in my 99 Metro. Car runs great and beat my 94 Swift Gt (both 5 speeds)

Metro is full interior, Swift is completely stripped 'cept two seats and the dash.

Metro has 1.6 block out of Sidekick using the Metro's 16v head.

BTW - Car will be for sale on Ebay soon.

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Selling my 99 Metro with a 1.6 swap.


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